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MCeTech, 2006
Montreal, May 16-19, 2004.

InterNeg Presentations


Tutorial: Introduction to ontology development
Wednesday May 17th; 14:00-17:30
  Simone Ludwig
 

In the past few years the use of ontologies has become increasingly popular on the World-Wide Web especially for the Semantic Web vision. An ontology is a model of entity and relationship in a specific domain and can vary from a taxonomy (knowledge with minimal hierarchy) to a thesaurus (words and synonyms) to a conceptual model (with more complex knowledge) to a logical theory (with very rich, complex, consistent and meaningful knowledge). Developing an ontology is similar to defining a set of data and their structure for other programs to use. Essentially, problem-solving methods, domain-independent applications, and software agents use ontologies and knowledge bases as data. In this tutorial, we will go over:

  • Introduction to semantics and ontologies
  • Application Ontology Examples
  • Ontology Engineering Methodology
  • Introduction to the ontology development tool called Protégé
  • Walk-through example

The attendees will acquire basic knowledge on the topics of semantics and ontology engineering. Furthermore, they will be introduced to an ontology engineering platform called Protégé and put into picture how an ontology is designed and created.


INSS - A New Approach in Designing Web-Based Negotiation Support Systems
Thursday, May 18; 10:45
  Shikui Wu
  Negotiation is vital in establishing business relationships between organizations and individuals. It is a complex, costly, time intensive and iterative process which involves heavy exchange and processing of information. E-negotiation uses information and communication technologies to automate exchange and processing. With the rapid development of online business interactions, the need for such systems has increased. Consequently, research initiatives are being focused towards designing and implementing these systems and deploying them on the Internet. INSS is a web-based e-negotiation system that allows business partners to negotiate over open and dynamically modifiable problems using different strategies and tactics. The system is based on an existing negotiation platform called Inspire although new design concepts were introduced and several features were added. This paper discusses the design and architecture of INSS and comments on a survey that was conducted to assess its usability. The novelty of our approach resides in the construction of a negotiation protocol allowing negotiators to formulate their own negotiation case and to specify the process as well as the permissible activities of the participants, and the introduction of the concepts of problem specification and issue modification in the design of the system.

Towads a Behavioural Agent-Based Assistant for e-Negotiations
Thursday May 18; 11:15
    Xiangua Huang
  A major challenge in e-negotiation systems (ENS) is that the context of negotiation such as negotiators’ characteristics, negotiation processes and system support varies in each case. This context dependency makes it difficult to apply a single ENS to a wide variety of negotiations. In this paper, to mitigate the context dependency issue, we propose to adopt the component-oriented approach and the Model-View-Controller design pattern in order to develop a generic ENS platform that can run multiple ENS’s. In this approach, an ENS is developed first by designing a high level e-negotiation protocol which specifies which page composer should be called at each state. A page composer contains the logic controlling integration of the model components (e.g. queries and computation modules) and view components (e.g. display text and formatting). Restriction or guidance of negotiation activities can be implemented by restricting or allowing a set of functionalities on a page and/or routing them to a different page. With this approach, the efforts to develop and modify ENS can be significantly reduced. Validity and usefulness of our approach is proved by re-developing two existing ENS’s - SimpleNS and Inspire – on a generic platform called Invite, which can execute e-negotiation protocols.

Measuring electronic negotiation system success: An empirical study on user satisfaction and technology acceptance
Thursday May 18; 11:45
    Eva Chen
  Over the years there has been much debate over the assessment of information systems (IS) success. The two leading paradigms are user satisfaction and technology acceptance. However, for the field of e-commerce a strategic perspective must also be incorporated into the theories to explain behavior. This paper integrates two approaches by examining the relationships among the usefulness of system features, user satisfaction, intention to use and strategic analysis on performance. The proposed model is tested with an electronic negotiation system (Inspire) in an internet field experiment with over 5,000 participants in 53 different countries. The system features consist of analytical, communication and graphical tools.

Developping context-independant e-negotiation systems using software protocol and MVC pattern
Thursday, May 18; 15:15
    JinBaek Kim

    A major challenge in e-negotiation systems (ENS) is that the context of negotiation such as negotiators’ characteristics, negotiation processes and system support varies in each case. This context dependency makes it difficult to apply a single ENS to a wide variety of negotiations. In this paper, to mitigate the context dependency issue, we propose to adopt the component-oriented approach and the Model-View-Controller design pattern in order to develop a generic ENS platform that can run multiple ENS’s. In this approach, an ENS is developed first by designing a high level e-negotiation protocol which specifies which page composer should be called at each state. A page composer contains the logic controlling integration of the model components (e.g. queries and computation modules) and view components (e.g. display text and formatting). Restriction or guidance of negotiation activities can be implemented by restricting or allowing a set of functionalities on a page and/or routing them to a different page. With this approach, the efforts to develop and modify ENS can be significantly reduced. Validity and usefulness of our approach is proved by re-developing two existing ENS’s - SimpleNS and Inspire – on a generic platform called Invite, which can execute e-negotiation protocols.

 


April 18, 2006